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it to light was found dead in his home. rebecca brooks was arrested this weekend after resigning as ceo of news corp. she is expected to testify tomorrow. this is not her first time appearing before parliament, the clip i'm showing you is from 2003. watch closely. brooks testifying with andy coulson. coulson went on to become david cameron's spokesman and has since resigned and has been arrested in the scandal. >> can i ask, the one element if you ever pay the bliss for information? >> we have paid police for information in the past, and it's been -- >> will you do it in the put? >> it depends on -- >> within the code and within the law, there is a clear public interest and the same holds for private detectives, subterfuge. >> it's illegal for police officers to receive payments. >> no, no, no. i just said within the law. >> this is not only the beginning of the scandal. it's the beginning of the news corporation's attempts at damage control. coulson stepping in to blunt brooks' answers. i spoke with the other british whistleblower about the death of sean hoare and about the spread of a
-news international chief rebekah brooks will prepare to face british legislators. >>> two giants of tech as ibm powers ahead but cisco loses its way. >>> and banks lead the losses as debt ditherring continues to drag the world stock markets. >>> rupert murdoch's power and influence will be put to the test later today. he and also his son, james, will be facing uk legislators in just a few hours from now. they'll also be alongside rebekah brooks, former editor of the "news of the world." it's expected to be a harsh grilling for the three individuals over what they knew about alleged phone hacking at the london tabloid "news of the world." those allegations have done quite as much to damage rupert murdoch's reputation as they've done to "news of the world's" stock. it's been plummeting. >> the company's become the target of a hack attack itself. lulzsec is claiming a hack attack with a fake story about murdoch being found dead in his garden. in a tragic turn one of the first journalists to expose hacking at "news of the world" was found dead on monday. sean hull was former "news of the world" emp
. thank you so much. now to wolf blitzer. "situation room" starts right now. >> thanks very much, brook. >>> two weeks before the united states may plunge into financial crisis. plu, media mogul rupert murdoch is just hours away from being grilled and lambasteds by british law makers and now a whistleblower in the growing phone hackl scandal reportedly is dead. and a 77-year-old man defends his home and family from an intruder with a gun. stand by for the dramatic story. that's even more compelling because -- get this -- he's a member of the united states congress. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> the u.s. defaulting on its debt for the first time in history? we can't state it enough, this has enormous consequences for all of us, and time is quickly running out to prevent what the president calls armageddon. let's check in with kate baldwin. she's standing by with the latest. where do the negotiations stand right now? >> the two top republicans in the house. no official readout from the white house, but president obama says we are making progress when asked today by
newsworthy of large type headlines. two days after she resigned, rebekah brooks walked into a police station for questioning and found herself under arrest. hours later, britain's top police officer, the chief of scotland yard resigned, and he acknowledges that the investigation was inadequate, and steven yates now announcing his resignation. the scandal has been growing steadily after reports that there was a hacking of an answering machine by "news of the world." tomorrow murdoch and his son james are scheduled to appear on a hearing in parliament. cnn will bring you that testimony live. dan rivers is inla london. rebekah brooks is expected to testify tomorrow, and now what are the plans in terms of questioning her tomorrow? >> reporter: well, politicians will have to be careful how they frame the questions to her. in britain, if there is a pending trial or the possibility of a pending trial, you have to be very careful what kind of news coverage is gained from that, because they don't want to prejudge the trial here. they don't want to sway a potential juror one way or the other. and this
expect that lawmakers will basically be grilling rupert murdoch, james murdoch and rebekah brooks on how much they knew about these phone hacking allegations and when did they know it and why didn't they put a stop to it sooner or be more forthcoming. they told lawmakers earlier it was one rogue reporter, an isolated incident and it didn't did any further than that. we know of course that it turns out that thousands of people may have had phone mail messages hacked and lawmakers want to get to the bottom of how much each of them knew. >> the other question is this whistle-blower found dead yesterday tragically. police are looking into that. what is the latest there? >> reporter: what we know is that basically police have confirmed that a man was found dead at his apartment. that man is believed to be the whistle-blower for news of the world. he confirmed that the editor of the paper not only knew about the phone hacking but actively encouraged it from his reporters. he was the only whistle-blower to really go public and confirm that this was the case. now, what we understand from police
to the "news of the world" and "the sun" was a part of it. >> thank you. >> miss brooks, rupert murdoch in his evidence session said quite clearly that the responsibility for the closure of "news of the world" lay fairly and squarely with senior management of that paper, which i assume that includes you. is that the case? >> i think -- i think i may have missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said it exactly how it was, that it was a collective decision. we all talked together. mr. murdoch was abroad at the time at a conference. we all talked together -- >> is that mr. murdoch senior? >> sorry, yes, rupert murdoch. yes. >> you wanted to say something else? >> no. sorry. >> when you were advising your staff that the paper was closing, during the private session, i think you said something like there was more to come. would you like to expand on what you meant by that? >> when i went down to the newsroom, to explain the decision, clearly and quite rightly, the journalists on the "news of the world" who very honorable journalists who have been putting out a newspaper under the scru
brooks, a rupert murdoch protege. she was a top executive before she resigned on friday. she was arrested a couple of days later. let's get straight to london to atika shubert. these witnesses are not under subpoena. they don't have to say a word, do they? >> no. they don't, but it's still a court and can be held in tempt of court for example. even though there is no particular oath here, there is an incredible amount of pressure on them to answer these questions. remember, particularly in the cases of james murdoch and rebekah brooks, they have told lawmakers in previous hearings the this was the end of it. it was a rogue reporter and a private investigator and that was the end of it. clearly, it was not. because it turns out that there are, in fact, thousands of phone mail messages that may have been hacked and now they are back in front of lawmakers again trying to explain why they didn't tell the full story the first time around. >> atika, we have been paying close attention to this since early this morning. you know parliament is very well known for its political theater. how many ti
, from james murdoch and rebecca brookibroo -- rebekah brooks, they sat there hour after hour, taking the questions in good humor. and that gives them credit to their benefit, that they did go through this process. ultimately, though, tonight, as rupert murdoch did say he doesn't take responsibility for what took place although he will have to be the man that sorts it out. >> are you responsible for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> who are responsible? >> the people i trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> can you name people? >> i worked with mr. hinton for 52 years and i would trust him with my life. >> what i think is interesting in that exchange, the normal phraseology for people doing that is, i was not to blame, but i take responsibility. the buck stops here. and what we didn't get there was that phraseology or some version thereof. we also finally, wolf, we did get later on in his final statement the hacking was wrong, the payments to the police were wrong, no excuses. >> and there was an incident there at one point where an intruder just showed up with some s
brooks' position at news international. in effect, rather than her being -- having her departure being announced, "the news of the world" was offered up as an alternative to try to deal with the whole thing. do you regret now making that decision? do you regret closing "the news of the world" to try and save rebekah brooks? in hindsight, do you wish you accepted her resignation to start with in order that that paper with a fine tradition could probably continue and all of the people who are now out of work could still be in work? >> i regret very much the pain of people that will not be able to find work. the two decisions were totally unrelated, absolutely sxl totally unrelated. >> so when you came into the uk and said your priority for rebekah brooks -- >> i'm not sure i said that. i was quoted as saying that. i had about 20 microphones stuck in my mouth, so i'm not sure what i said. >> you were misquoted? >> i'm not saying that. i just don't remember. >> i think it's important -- i'm sorry, mr. chairman. >> yes. >> mr. davis, it's important to know the closure of a newspaper with a
his first in command, rebecca brook, was sort of toeing the appropriate line. so whether there's a cover-up there that reaches the highest levels of newscorp or whether it's just the head of a company where there are problems and he's trying to fix them as best he can, i guess we'll -- we may find out. we may not find out. >> some people seem to feel it's really that connection between the rebecca brook, the "news of the world" editor, formerly, and the power that she really had in politics. and david cameron's former assistant also having worked over at the paper. that there just seems to be this coziness that is making people uncomfortable. >> well, i mean, we have the same thing in washington frankly. there's been a lot of coziness over the years. the white house press corps and the -- and government at all levels. i think that's a problem when people live and work and depend on each other for their livelihood. as the press and powerful people do. but, you know, i think murdoch is probably -- may not be the person this hits. i mean, i wonder if there's -- if there's an equiv
of how these men and rebekah brooks allowed or created or allowed to exist a culture that these things could happen and they didn't know about it. >> and it was profound theater to begin with, and as you mentioned, a lot of questions we would still like answered. we'll see how that plays out, but in the middle of this theater, a subplot, if you will. somebody tries to pie rupert murdoch. describe the scene as you recall it and especially i would say a rather feisty defense of mr. murdoch by his wife. >> oh, i mean, well, we're watching from the back. the picture -- all of a sudden, the noise. you see this woman in pink launch herself, going to give somebody a right hook. you then see james murdoch get out the chair like this. now, at first i couldn't tell whether mr. murdoch sr. had been hit. you can then -- in later pictures if you look close, you can see the foam. more than one person suggested that, you know, this could have been a brick, it could have been, you know, nails, it could have been much more serious. you have to bear in mind if it had been anything like that, it wouldn't
with rebekah brooks, the chief executive but we're told that they were appropriate but don't know what the content is yet. i don't want to get too bogged down in the detail. the short answer is not at the moment. i don't think anyone's talking about him being in a perilous position yet. this is slowly incrementally getting closer and closer to downing street's door. it is very, very awkward for the prime minister. it's taken up a lot of his time and put him in a difficult position. i think he's desperately hoping after today's combative exchanges in the house of commons behind me, this will be a line drawn under it. it will then go back to the police inquiry. this lot the politicians will be off on their summer holidays and i would think david cameron will be hoping this will be off his initial sort of entree for the summer and he can concentrate on other things. >> let's revisit rupert murdoch's testimony. refusing to take any responsibility for this phone hacking scandal. take a quick peek. >> do you accept that ultimately, you are responsible for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> you're
. >> rebekah brooks, her testimony yesterday said the company acted quickly and concisely in the hacking scandal. but she's been arrested by police. how did she do? >> she looked pretty shifty to me at all of the commons hearing evidence yesterday. i didn't quite believe a word she said. once more, what said was plainly not true because she didn't cure it early. as we know, news executives who could it be aside from rebekah brooks stood in way of the investigation. did everything to make sure it was killed off early. >> what about andy coulson? we talk about the impact on cameron, did cameron throw him under the bus? >> he tried to, but i suspect coulson is in a position to dump on all the news corp. people if he wants to. he can strie to implicate other people. >> what about john yates? he's criticized for shutting down the original phone hacking investigation. i'm reminded of that show "star trek" that every time an officer was at the party he was going to get killed. >> i guess he's the most obvious fall guy. on the other hand i think he was a roughly honest cop. the reason he closed
former bosses, rebekah brooks, andy coulson who are arrested, not criminal masterminds but engaged in a media empire where criminality was rif, if that media empire got david cameron elected as the british prime minister, that's a good story. >> i have a break coming up. since you mentioned rebekah brooks and andy coulson, both former editors of "news of the world," do you have any doubt that they knew phone hacking was going on at that paperer? >> i have no doubt whatsoever. piers morgan was also my editor, but in that time in 1994-'5, it wasn't illegal. you could sit outside someone's house and tap into their phone conversations and record all of it. and also look at their messages. i need to ask a lawyer actually, is it legal for a wife to hack into her husband's phone if she thinks he's cheating? about 10% of the population of britain have done that, too sgle well ooh keep our focus on journalists. paul mcmull land, good luck with the pub. >> thanks. >>> coming up on the second part of "reliable sources," debt talks collapse after news reports of a deal. how much of the press i
hacking scandal. he and his son james and former news corp. executive rebekah brooks were grilled today. the elder murdoch apologizing but refusing to take the rap. >> do you feel that ultimately you are responsible for this whole fiasco? >> nope. >> you're not responsible? who is responsible? >> the people that i trusted to run it. and then maybe the people they trusted. >> no apology and no stepping down. >> have you considered resigning? >> >> no. >> why not? >> because i feel that people i trusted, not saying who, i don't know what level. have let me down. and i think they have behaved disgracefully and betrayed the company and me. and it's for them to pay. i think that frankly i'm the best person to clean this up. >> and speaking of cleaning up, the proceedings were interrupted briefly when a protestor deliver a shaving cream pie. take a look at this. keep your eye on the lower left-hand corner of your screen. it happens pretty quickly. >> oh! >> here it is quickly again in slow motion. here comes the pie. and that pink blur that you see over there is rupert murdoch's wife wendy wh
murdoch's son james and former "news of the world" editor rebecca brooks. >>> in london today, the parents of murdered teen milly met political leaders in parliament. salley and bob say the phone hacking investigation nuft look at politician's ties to the media, and dowlers say it fueled this. they were given false hope she was alive. it led to other disclosures of hacking or hacking attempts that reached all the way to the royal throne. >>> well, stocks are treading water today. the dow chips have been moving between positive and negative territory all morning. the dow jones down about 16 points or so. investors are perhaps taking a breather on negotiations over the debt ceiling playing out in washington. >>> president obama says there's a groundhog day feeling at the white house. he and congressional leaders immediate again today to work on a deal to raise the nation's borrowing limit. republicans are insisting on deep cuts only. the president wants to close tax loopholes as well. now, the debt ceiling deadline is three weeks from today. and so far, nobody is blinking. >>> it's going to
. they can't force rupert and james murdoch to appear but they can force rebecca brooks to appear. if she continues to refuse to respond, issue a summons to her, they receiptcally they could send their security apparatus of the house behind me down to actually force her, you know, arrest her effectively to come along. >> all right. dan rivers for us. thanks so much. we will continue to follow this, of course, every day, new development and more troubling development. >>> still to come this morning, high ask dry. first lost their paychecks and now there may not be any beer to help pass the time during the government shutdown in minnesota. >> that's the part -- no beer. >> big problem. a lot of beer that won't be on the shelves. >>> the president's right-hand man on jobs. jeffrey immelt talks about how they plan to get america working again unchlgth fire under fire. >> gunfire all around us. we are rushing out of this area. with dha and essential nutrients also found in mother's milk. purina puppy chow. right now, go to priceline for a sneak peek at recent winning and better than ever! hote
this committee because they're not british citizens. but their chief executive, rebekah brooks, can be forced to come and answer questions. it's going to be fascinating next tuesday to see who turns up and what they say, and i would imagine this story will just keep rumbling all summer. now as you say, with senator jay rockefeller also getting interested in this in the states as well, this is now not only a u.k. story, it's an international story. it's a u.s. story as well because, of course, rupert murdock has interests all around the place, not just here, he's got "the wall street journal," fox news, "new york post" to name but a few. >> i want to ask you this. you mentioned rupert murdock and his son not being british citizens can't be forced to testify before parliament. what is the outcome if they do? in the united states we have a lot of people called to testify before congress, subpoenaed, they have to go. but it's unclear unless you lie to congress, what the consequences are of that. are there really consequences to this editor in chief being called before parliament? >> well, it's tr
. >> elizabeth murdoch has denied reports she blamed her brother james aura beck cag brooks for the damage the scandal has done to her father's company. she once started her own independent tv firm only to be bought by her father for nearly $650 million. >> this is a man who cares so much about his legacy, he once said to me, all i want is for my kids to be decent people. >> they love their father, but keep an eye on replacing him when that day comes. >> james very much very much wanted it. they all wanted it. there was the period when elizabeth wanted -- elizabeth was the heir and that didn't work out. and then lackland and james. so actually this rather continues the pattern. >> keeping it all in the family. rupert murdoch told questioners about his late father buying a small newspaper, rooting out scandals. >> which i remain very, very proud of. >> i think students of history are well aware of your family business. >> i would love to see my sons and daughters follow if they're interested. >> a hint from the father that the children may be less interested now that the company is embroile
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)